An analysis of prejudice in justice in the case of tom robinson in the book to kill a mockingbird

Growing Up Themes and Colors LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in To Kill a Mockingbird, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work. Atticus's belief in treating and respecting everyone as an individual is contrasted in To Kill a Mockingbird with a number of other worldviews.

An analysis of prejudice in justice in the case of tom robinson in the book to kill a mockingbird

Heck Tate is the first witness. Under cross-examination, he admits that a doctor was never called to the scene to examine Mayella Ewell. Bob Ewell takes the stand next and causes a stir in the courtroom with his bad attitude and foul language.

Ewell is not shaken from his story, but Atticus carefully plants the seed that Mr. Ewell himself could've beaten Mayella. Mayella takes the stand next. Even though Atticus believes that she's lying, he treats her with courtesy and respect; Mayella thinks that he's making fun of her.

Her testimony soon proves that Mayella is unused to gentility and common courtesy. Atticus asks Tom to stand up so that Mayella may identify him; as he does, Scout notices that Tom's left arm is withered and useless — he could not have committed the crime in the way it was described.

The state rests its case. Atticus calls only one witness — Tom Robinson. Tom tells the true story, being careful all the while not to come right out and say that Mayella is lying. However, Tom makes a fatal error when he admits under cross-examination that he, a black man, felt sorry for Mayella Ewell.

Dill has a very emotional response to Mr.

The theme of Prejudice in To Kill a Mockingbird from LitCharts | The creators of SparkNotes

Gilmer's questioning and leaves the courtroom in tears. Scout follows Dill outside, where they talk with Dolphus Raymond, who reveals the secret behind his brown bag and his drinking.

Scout and Dill return to the courtroom in time to hear the last half of Atticus' impassioned speech to the jury. Just as Atticus finishes, Calpurnia walks into the courtroom and heads toward Atticus. Analysis At this point in the story, readers may be tempted to think that Tom Robinson's trial is basically about white prejudice against African Americans.

Prejudice certainly does come to play in the court proceedings, but Lee explores much deeper human emotions and societal ideals than the straightforward mistreatment of a person based on skin color.

The Ewells are what people today would call "white trash. No truant officers could keep their numerous offspring in school; no public health officer could free them from congenital defects, various worms, and the diseases indigenous to filthy surroundings.

Just beyond their home is a "Negro settlement.

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The fact is that most in the African American community live cleaner, more honest, and more productive lives than the Ewells. Consequently, the resentment against blacks on the part of the "white trash" runs deep.

Against this backdrop of a trial where a "white-trash" female is accusing a black man of a violent crime, Lee expertly explores several of the novel's major themes while focusing on the questions of prejudice and class or social station.

In Maycomb during the time of Tom Robinson's trial, African Americans reside at the bottom of the totem pole as far as power in the community. Even Scout, who probably can't yet define the term "prejudice," tells Dill, "'Well, Dill, after all, he's just a Negro.

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In Scout's world, some things just are, and the fact that blacks are "just Negroes" is one of them. In fact, Scout shows her lack of intentional prejudice by admitting "If he [Tom Robinson] had been whole, he would have been a fine specimen of a man. If Scout believed that blacks were truly lesser, then her character would have no reason for telling this story — the story she'd tell, if she told one at all, would be markedly different.

The blacks in the community accept their lot. They may not like the treatment they receive, but to defy the rules set by the community means literally risking their lives. Tom Robinson did nothing but help Mayella Ewell. In fact, he "was probably the only person who was ever decent to her.

But, for an African American man to publicly admit feeling pity for any white person is overstepping societal bounds.

An analysis of prejudice in justice in the case of tom robinson in the book to kill a mockingbird

In truth, Tom embarrasses Mayella by refusing her advances and Mayella embarrasses her father by making advances toward a black man.

Bob Ewell's pride can't afford for a black man to go back to his community talking about a white woman making a pass at him.To Kill a Mockingbird Justice One of the themes in ' To Kill a Mockingbird' is injustice.

I am going to show how other characters apart from Tom Robinson are affected by injustice. Two of the characters affected in this way are Boo Radley and Mayella Ewell. Novel Analysis “To Kill a Mockingbird” .

An analysis of prejudice in justice in the case of tom robinson in the book to kill a mockingbird

Another example of a person having the symbolization of a Mockingbird is Tom Robinson. To kill a mockingbird theme essay The book “to kill a mockingbird,” written by Harper Lee, uses the mockingbird to symbolize innocence.

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Home / Literature / To Kill a Mockingbird / Characters / Character Analysis. Like Boo Radley, Tom Robinson isn't just an individual. He's also a litmus test for Maycomb's racism—and, unfortunately for him, it fails.

but in the secret courts of men's hearts Atticus had no case. Tom was a dead man. The ThemeTracker below shows where, and to what degree, the theme of Prejudice appears in each chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird. Click or tap on any chapter to read its Summary & Analysis.

Click or tap on any chapter to read its Summary & Analysis. Boo Radley and Tom. Robinson and prejudged; but because prejudice is so inclusive, even those who help the “mockingbirds”, Atticus, become victims of prejudice. Maycomb people gossip about Boo Radley because he chooses to stay in his house, while Tom Robinson is stereotyped by Maycomb because of his skin color.

The ThemeTracker below shows where, and to what degree, the theme of Prejudice appears in each chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird. Click or tap on any chapter to read its Summary & Analysis.

Click or tap on any chapter to read its Summary & Analysis.

Tom Robinson To Kill A Mockingbird