How little things make a big difference

Tap here to turn on desktop notifications to get the news sent straight to you. Last week, we addressed the source of burnout and promised to address satisfaction and accomplishment this week. Here goes one take on the subject - not the only take, nor an exhaustive one, just another view, one that may be useful. When I was growing up, my father owned a little two man machine shop.

How little things make a big difference

An excellent technical introduction to nanotechnology is Nanosystems: Eric Drexler, Wiley The Feynman Lectures on Physics are available online. I imagine experimental physicists must often look with envy at men like Kamerlingh Onnes, who discovered a field like low temperature, which seems to be bottomless and in which one can go down and down.

Such a man is then a leader and has some temporary monopoly in a scientific adventure. Percy Bridgman, in designing a way to obtain higher pressures, opened up another new field and was able to move into it and to lead us all along. The development of ever higher vacuum was a continuing development of the same kind.

I would like to describe a field, in which little has been done, but in which an enormous amount can be done in principle. This field is not quite the same as the others in that it will not tell us much of fundamental physics in the sense of, "What are the strange particles?

Furthermore, a point that is most important is that it would have an enormous number of technical applications. What I want to talk about is the problem of manipulating and controlling things on a small scale. As soon as I mention this, people tell me about miniaturization, and how far it has progressed today.

They tell me about electric motors that are the size of the nail on your small finger. And there is a device on the market, they tell me, by which you can write the Lord's Prayer on the head of a pin.

Monday, April 7th, 2008

But that's nothing; that's the most primitive, halting step in the direction I intend to discuss. It is a staggeringly small world that is below.

In the yearwhen they look back at this age, they will wonder why it was not until the year that anybody began seriously to move in this direction.

Why cannot we write the entire 24 volumes of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica on the head of a pin?

How little things make a big difference

Let's see what would be involved. The head of a pin is a sixteenth of an inch across. If you magnify it by 25, diameters, the area of the head of the pin is then equal to the area of all the pages of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica. Therefore, all it is necessary to do is to reduce in size all the writing in the Encyclopaedia by 25, times.

In other words, one of those dots still would contain in its area 1, atoms. So, each dot can easily be adjusted in size as required by the photoengraving, and there is no question that there is enough room on the head of a pin to put all of the Encyclopaedia Brittanica.

Furthermore, it can be read if it is so written. How would we read it? If we had something written in such a way, we could read it using techniques in common use today.

They will undoubtedly find a better way when we do actually have it written, but to make my point conservatively I shall just take techniques we know today. We would press the metal into a plastic material and make a mold of it, then peel the plastic off very carefully, evaporate silica into the plastic to get a very thin film, then shadow it by evaporating gold at an angle against the silica so that all the little letters will appear clearly, dissolve the plastic away from the silica film, and then look through it with an electron microscope!

There is no question that if the thing were reduced by 25, times in the form of raised letters on the pin, it would be easy for us to read it today. Furthermore, there is no question that we would find it easy to make copies of the master; we would just need to press the same metal plate again into plastic and we would have another copy.

How do we write small? The next question is:Among the most important checks you can complete before leaving on a trip has to do with the pressure in your tires. If you have the wrong pressure in your RV tires before you leave – either too much or too little – you will be at risk for tire failure.

Jesse Eisenberg as Mark Zuckerberg, the founder of Facebook, and Rooney Mara as his girlfriend Erica in The Social Network. How long is a generation these days? I must be in Mark Zuckerberg’s generation—there are only nine years between us—but somehow it doesn’t feel that way. The Concept and Teaching of Place-Value Richard Garlikov.

An analysis of representative literature concerning the widely recognized ineffective learning of "place-value" by American children arguably also demonstrates a widespread lack of understanding of the concept of place-value among elementary school arithmetic teachers and among researchers themselves.

The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference [Malcolm Gladwell] on attheheels.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

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The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips. Atoms Around Us What is an atom? Atoms are building blocks.

How little things make a big difference

If you want to create a language, you'll need an alphabet. If you want to build molecules, you will need atoms from different attheheels.comts are the alphabet in the language of molecules.

If you saw a penny on the sidewalk, would you bend over to pick it up? It’s a constant balancing act if you’re trying to save money — the effort to save money vs. how much you’ll actually save.

Some people aren’t willing to bend over to pick that penny up, while others are.

40 Little Things That Make a Big Difference in Your Day